July 5

Scientist discovers particular network names can disable Wi-Fi on iPhones

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A security scientist has actually discovered that specific Wi-Fi networks with the percent sign (%) in their names can disable Wi-Fi on iPhones and other iOS gadgets. Carl Schou tweeted that if an iPhone comes within series of a network called %secretclub%power, the gadget will not have the ability to utilize Wi-Fi or any associated functions, and even after resetting network settings, the bug might continue to render Wi-Fi on the gadget unusable.

A couple of weeks earlier, Schou and his not-for-profit group, Secret Club, which reverse-engineers software application for research study functions, discovered that if an iPhone linked to a network with the SSiD name %p%s%s%s%s%n it would trigger a bug in iOS’ networking stack that would disable its Wi-Fi, and system networking functions like AirDrop would end up being unusable.

9to5 Mac used a possible description for the unusual bug:

the ‘% [character] syntax is typically utilized in programs languages to format variables into an output string. In C, the ‘%n’ specifier implies to conserve the variety of characters composed into the format string out to a variable passed to the string format function. The Wi-Fi subsystem most likely passes the Wi-Fi network name (SSID) unsanitized to some internal library that is carrying out string format, which in turn triggers an approximate memory compose and buffer overflow. This will result in memory corruption and the iOS guard dog will eliminate the procedure, thus efficiently disabling Wi-Fi for the user.

We’ve connected to Apple to see if it’s dealing with a repair, and will upgrade if we hear back from them. As 9to5 Mac notes, the bug can likely be prevented by not linking to Wi-Fi networks with percent signs in their names.

In C, the ‘%n’ specifier implies to conserve the number of characters composed into the format string out to a variable passed to the string format function. The Wi-Fi subsystem most likely passes the Wi-Fi network name (SSID) unsanitized to some internal library that is carrying out string format, which in turn triggers an approximate memory compose and buffer overflow. We’ve reached out to Apple to see if it’s working on a repair, and will upgrade if we hear back from them.Source


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